Again this year, we are proud to have outstanding students on the job market. For a list of our placement candidates and brief sketches of each, please select a field below.

POLITICAL SCIENCE & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

PhD candidates and recent graduates currently on the market:


STEPHEN BAGWELL
PhD, Expected 2018
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. K. Chad Clay (Chair), Dr. Shane Singh, Dr. Jeffrey Berejikian, Dr. Ryan Bakker
Dissertation: Catching up Developmental Measures with Concepts: iSHHED, the Index of Sustainable, Health, Human Capital, and Economic Development
Professional Website: https://smbagwell.com/

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) whose research focuses on the nexus of political economy and human security, broadly defined. My projects evaluate the role of international economic factors as well as domestic institutions on improving human outcomes. In one project, currently under review, a coauthor and I examine the conditions under which naming and shaming campaigns by international human rights organizations are most likely to elicit improved respect for physical integrity rights. My dissertation provides another example: I develop an improved measure of the concept of development, which allows scholars to focus both on macroeconomic fundamentals and individual outcomes. In separate papers demonstrating the utility of the measure, I evaluate how labor institutions affect those outcomes and also how international organizations like the IMF and World Bank affect those outcomes.

I have taught 11 different courses across three universities, including introductory courses in American politics, global issues, international relations, and comparative politics. I have also taught upper-level courses in political economy, human rights, and development. Additionally, I have taught two courses as part of an undergraduate methods sequence: Introduction to Statistics, a general education course that is open to all majors (and includes a lab where I teach students to use R), and Research Design, a course required of Political Science majors. At the Department of International affairs at the University of Georgia, I won the Christopher Allen Award for excellence in teaching.

 

GORDON BALLINGRUD
PhD, Expected 2018
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Susan Haire (Chair), Dr. Christina Boyd, Dr. Richard Vining, Dr. Sean Ingham.
Dissertation: An Empirical and Philosophical Exploration of the Effects of Presidential Non-Implementation on the Behavior of the U.S. Supreme Court
Professional Website: https://gordon-ballingrud-bpty.squarespace.com/config/

I am a doctoral candidate in American politics with a focus on federal courts, and a minor specialization in political theory, with an emphasis on Rawls, Nozick, and Dworkin. I have two works set to be published by the end of 2017: “Coalitional Instability and the Three-Fifths Compromise” written with Keith Dougherty, and to be published in the American Journal of Political Science, and “Public Reason as Highest Law”, a commentary on part of Rawls’ Political Liberalism, to be published in Law and Philosophy. My dissertation centers on the differences in behavior of the Supreme Court justices when the President is ideologically distant from them. I argue that the threat of non-implementation of the Court’s opinions in “lateral” cases (cf. Hall 2014) causes the Court to rule more often in favor of the government than they do when ideological distance is low, or the case requires no executive implementation. I explore these effects on the justices’ merits votes and majority opinion construction, while offering and testing multiple theoretical mechanisms. I conclude with a philosophical examination of my findings, assessing the President’s effect on the Court through an examination of the concept of democracy and the role of courts in it. I am currently teaching our course POLS 4040, “American Political Thought”; I have been a teaching assistant for such classes as “Introduction to American Politics”, “Constitutional Politics of Equality”, and “Philosophy of Law”. I have also been a research assistant to Audrey Haynes, Sean Ingham, Christy Boyd, Robert Grafstein, Jamie Carson, Keith Dougherty, Scott Ainsworth, and Alex Kaufman.

 

MATT BUFFORD
PhD, Expected 2019
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Shane Singh (Chair), Dr. Hanna Kleider, Dr. Ryan Bakker, Dr. Alexa Bankert
Dissertation: Identity and Political Behavior: How Attitudes toward Immigrants Shape Political Outcomes
Professional Website: https://mattbufford.wordpress.com/

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) specializing in political behavior, political psychology, and social identity in advanced democracies. Using quantitative methods and survey experiments, my research focuses on the intersection of public opinion and policy results, particularly with regard to immigration and support for welfare policies. My research agenda addresses the question of how individuals in the West think about immigration and identity and how this perception affects their political behavior. I am also broadly interested in the ways political actors use issue framing to alter political outcomes, and I seek to further explore this topic in experimental settings.

I have experience teaching American Government, Global Issues, and Comparative Politics at the University of Georgia. Additionally, as an instructor for the Duke Talent Identification Program, I have developed and taught introductory international relations courses. I am prepared to teach several other courses, particularly on quantitative methods, research design, and political behavior.

 

JASON BYERS
PhD, Expected 2019
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Jamie L. Carson (Chair), Dr. James Monogan, Dr. Michael Lynch, Dr. Anthony Madonna.
Dissertation: Walking in Their Shoes: An Examination of Congressional Representation from 1980-2016
Professional Website: https://www.jasonsbyers.com

I am a doctoral candidate (ABD) in American politics. Substantively, I am interested in American political institutions with a specific emphasis on congressional politics and elections, executive politics, separation of powers, representation, institutional development, and quantitative methods. My published work has appeared in The Forum, a book chapter in Changing How America Votes, and I have been invited to revise and resubmit an article at Congress & the Presidency.

I have previously taught multiple sections on Introductory American Government and a graduate seminar on teaching effectiveness. I have also guest lectured for an undergraduate U.S. Presidency section and a graduate Time Series Analysis seminar. Furthermore, I served as a teaching assistant for Introductory American Government.

 

AUSTIN DOCTOR
PhD, Expected 2019
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. K. Chad Clay (Chair), Dr. Daniel Hill, Dr. Amanda Murdie, Dr. Andrew Owsiak
Dissertation: Rebel Leaders & the Management of Armed Rebel Organizations in Intrastate Conflict
Professional Website: https://www.austincdoctor.com/

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) studying international security and intrastate conflict. My research investigates the behavior of armed non-state actors and their effects on conflict processes. My research agenda addresses two broad research questions. First, how do rebel leaders’ attributes and pre-war experiences shape the decisions that they make on and off the battlefield? Second, how do foreign fighters influence the behavior and performance of rebel groups in intrastate conflicts? I am also interested in the determinants of human security in conflict spaces.

At the University of Georgia, I have taught “Introduction to Global Issues” and “Terrorism & Insurgency.” In addition to these courses, my substantive teaching interests include political violence, intrastate warfare, war and conflict in Africa, and human rights. Methodologically, I am prepared to instruct courses in quantitative methods, research design, and applications of game theory.

 

SARAH HUNTER
PhD, Expected 2019

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Amanda Murdie (Chair), Dr. K. Chad Clay, Dr. Keith Poole, Dr. Ryan Bakker, Dr James Monogan
Dissertation: Delegation and Agents in Foreign Aid: Understanding the Importance of Agent Choice in Foreign Aid
Professional Website: www.sarahghunter.com

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) in the fields of International Relations and Political Methodology. My research focuses on the impact of international organizations (broadly defined) on states’ foreign policy decisions and outcomes. My dissertation analyzes how international organizations impact foreign aid decisions by serving as agents of the donor states, and proposes a new empirical model to use in the study of foreign aid delegation. My broader research agenda addresses the role of international organizations, especially non-governmental organizations in the international system, particularly regarding issues of humanitarian relief and economic and political development.  The second part of my research agenda seeks to discover and apply new empirical models to be used to answer my substantive questions.

I have experience teaching a variety of courses, including undergraduate courses in international relations, comparative politics, and introductory research methods. I have also served as a teaching assistant in several upper-level American Politics courses. Additionally, I am prepared to teach several courses at all levels including quantitative methods, research design, applied Bayesian methods, and various substantive courses as needed.

 

JOSHUA JACKSON
PhD, Expected 2019
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Andrew Owsiak (Chair), Dr. Amanda Murdie, Dr. Daniel Hill, Dr. James Monogan
Dissertation: An Issues approach to Civil Conflict Processes
Professional Website: https://www.joshualjackson.org

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) in International Relations. My substantive research interests lie primarily in civil conflict, its connection to international conflict, and the externalities of conflict such as human rights concerns and refugee flows. I also focus broadly on quantitative research methods with a specialization in spatial analysis. My published work has appeared in Political Research Quarterly, Research & Politics, and Political Science Research and Methods..

I have taught International Conflict and Introduction to International Relations at the undergraduate level and have been a teaching assistant for various courses and IR simulations, including Crisis Diplomacy, Reacting to the Past: The French Revolution, and Statecraft. More information about my research and teaching is available at my website, www.joshualjackson.org.

 

LEE LUKOFF
PhD, Expected 2018
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Loch Johnson (Chair), Dr. Jeffrey Berejikian, Dr. Lihi Ben-Shitrit, Dr. Rongbin Han
Dissertation: The Development of the US-Israel Special Relationship 1981-1989
Professional Website: https://leelukoff.wixsite.com/leelukoff

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) in International Relations with a minor in Comparative Politics, and I hold Master’s Degrees from Boston College (Political Science) and George Mason University (Public Policy). My research interests include International Relations, American Foreign Policy, Intelligence Studies, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, and Political Psychology. I served as a Teaching Assistant for Introduction to American government for four semesters and have taught seven courses as Instructor of Record on topics such as International Conflict, Global Issues, and US-Israel Relations. I currently serve as an Adjunct Instructor for UGA’s Washington DC Semester Program, where I teach a seminar and mentor undergraduates pursuing careers in public policy and government in the nation’s capital.

In 2017, I was awarded a university grant that allowed me to serve as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. I am also a founding member of the Early Career Scholars Group of Intelligence Studies in the International Studies Association and have forthcoming articles in the Journal of Intelligence History, American Intelligence Journal, and the Encyclopedia of U.S. Intelligence. My book reviews have been published in the Journal of Cold War Studies and the International Journal of Intelligence, Security, and Public Affairs.

 

SPIA-student-images-norrisJUSTIN NORRIS
PhD, 2018
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Paul-Henri Gurian (Chair), Dr. Audrey Haynes, Dr. James Monogan and Dr. Jamie Carson
Dissertation: Follow the Money: An Integrated Theory of Donor Motivations and the Resulting Implications for Presidential Campaign Coffers in the Invisible Primary
Professional Website: http://justinjnorris.weebly.com

I earned my PhD in the department of political science here at the University of Georgia. I study American elections, political behavior, public opinion, American political institutions, and research methodology. I currently have a number of papers under review that examine a number of topics, including: the role of party loyalty for committee appointments in the US House of Representatives, the impact of electoral concerns on vote switching in the US Senate, and an examination of the differences between partisans and political independents as it relates to beliefs over the proper role of interest groups in the American political process. I have had the opportunity to teach a number of courses, including: introduction to American government, electoral behavior, political parties, and campaigns and elections.

 

K. ANNE WATSON
PhD, Expected 2019
Curriculum Vitae

Dissertation Committee: Dr. Daniel W. Hill, Jr. (Chair), Dr. Lihi Ben Shitrit, Dr. K. Chad Clay and Dr. James Monogan
Dissertation: From Interests to Rights: Using CEDAW to Understand the Substantive Representation of Women
Professional Website: http://www.kannewatson.com

I am a PhD candidate (ABD) in the fields of Comparative Politics and Political Methodology. My research agenda is focused on the ratification of international law, its incorporation in domestic policy, and the outcomes of each, particularly with regards to women’s rights, economic rights, and the measurement of human rights conditions. In my dissertation, a direct extension of this agenda, I tackle the puzzle that although widely ratified international law guarantees women equal access to and enjoyment of the economy, women’s enjoyment of their economic rights continues to show variation–even in developed, democratic countries. I argue that this variation is a result of differing degrees of support for specific women-friendly policies in these countries’ legislatures. I also have a forthcoming article with Daniel W. Hill, Jr. in International Studies Quarterly.

As a graduate student at the University of Georgia, I have taken advantage of multiple opportunities to develop my teaching. First, I have served as the instructor of record for Human Rights and as a discussion leader for multiple sections of Introduction to American Government. In the spring of 2018, these experiences led to me being awarded the Center for Teaching and Learning’s Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award and the Department of International Affairs’ Christopher S. Allen Graduate Student Award for Excellence in Teaching. Second, I am pursuing the Interdisciplinary Certificate in University Teaching, which I expect in spring 2019. Finally, for the 2018-2019 academic year, I am a member of the University of Georgia’s Future Faculty Fellows Program. I have also prepared materials for a number of substantive and methodological classes, including Introduction to Comparative Politics, International law, Women and World Politics, and Introduction to Research Methods.

 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION & Policy

For a list of our Doctoral students who are currently on the market, click here.