The Double Dawgs program was created to give ambitious and motivated students a competitive advantage in today’s knowledge economy. By earning both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in five years or less, students can save time and money while positioning themselves for success after graduation. SPIA offers seven different Double Dawgs programs. For more general information about the Double Dawgs program, click here.

How to Apply
  • All of these programs have a two-step application process. The first step is the Application to the Pathway. The requirements to apply to the Pathway are:
    • Minimum 3.5 UGA GPA
    • Minimum 60 hours in-progress with at least 30 hours of UGA coursework (excluding AP, IB, or transfer credits)
    • 9 hours of major coursework completed or in-progress
  • Once those requirements are met, an interested student submits an application to Paul Welch in 103 Candler Hall for initial eligibility review. Eligible applications are forwarded to the Double Dawg Coordinator of the graduate program for approval. Admission to the Pathway does not imply admission to the graduate program. The Pathway allows students to take graduate courses and the graduate program to test the student.
  • Accepted Pathway students begin graduate coursework as early as the fall term of the third year. 12 hours of graduate coursework applies towards both degrees, but only as general electives for the A.B. Graduate courses may not apply towards undergraduate major requirements. Students may take more than 12 hours of graduate courses before graduating with the A.B., but those credit hours beyond the 12 apply to the graduate program only. Students must graduate with the A.B. at the end of their fourth year.
  • SPIA will host further events with information specific to each graduate Double Dawgs program covering in-depth descriptions of the academics of each graduate program, differences in the Pathway, and time-lines for application to the Graduate School. There will also be information available via http://spia.uga.edu in the near future.
AB in International Affairs & Masters of International Policy

The A.B. in International Affairs focuses on how governments interact with one another (international relations) and the similarities and differences in political systems (comparative politics) with additional strengths in security studies, political economy, and issues of community. It is an especially appropriate major for those who want to understand politics on the world stage, including how politics and economics combine to shape policy outcomes, how nations and leaders strategize, cooperate and interact in times of peace and in times of conflict, and how nongovernmental organizations, political movements, and demographic changes influence global events.

Building on that undergraduate coursework, the Master of International Policy (MIP) prepares students for careers in the international arena through a rigorous course of study in policy analysis and international affairs.  The program relies on a problem-oriented approach so as to prepare students for the complex work of defining, analyzing, and solving real-world challenges.

MIP students explore a range of contemporary national and international security issues and examine how political, economic, and social forces affect policy formation and implementation. Additionally, the program offers a highly specialized focus on nuclear nonproliferation and strategic trade.

MIP courses are taught by nuclear security experts at the Center for International Trade and Security (CITS), as well as by scholars in the School of Public and International Affairs and the School of Engineering.  The MIP program of study consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours (12 classes) and the completion of a capstone project.

Double Dawgs students begin their MIP coursework with INTL 6200 “Pre-Seminar in International Relations” no later than the second term of their third year. They continue with INTL 6000 “Foundations of International Policy” and INTL 6010 “Research Methods in International Policy” in the first term of the fourth year and continue with two more topical courses in the second term of the fourth year.

Double Dawgs students apply to the Graduate School for admission to the graduate program in the first term of the fourth year.

Individual students’ timelines will vary, so it is important to plan in consultation with both the undergraduate and graduate program advisors for any Double Dawgs program.

AB in Political Science & Masters of International Policy

The A.B. in Political Science offers a broad and deep understanding of politics within a structured program of study. In addition to a liberal arts foundation, it focuses on a range of courses covering politics in the United States, important debates in political philosophy, legal and constitutional issues, research skills and other topics. Students focused on public service, public policy, government, politics, and law find a ready home in the program.

The Master of International Policy (MIP) prepares students for careers in the international arena through a rigorous course of study in policy analysis and international affairs.  The program relies on a problem-oriented approach so as to prepare students for the complex work of defining, analyzing, and solving real-world challenges.

MIP students explore a range of contemporary national and international security issues and examine how political, economic, and social forces affect policy formation and implementation. Additionally, the program offers a highly specialized focus on nuclear nonproliferation and strategic trade.

MIP courses are taught by nuclear security experts at the Center for International Trade and Security (CITS), as well as by scholars in the School of Public and International Affairs and the School of Engineering.  The MIP program of study consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours (12 classes) and the completion of a capstone project.

Double Dawgs students begin their MIP coursework with INTL 6200 “Pre-Seminar in International Relations” no later than the second term of their third year. They continue with INTL 6000 “Foundations of International Policy” and INTL 6010 “Research Methods in International Policy” in the first term of the fourth year and continue with two more topical courses in the second term of the fourth year.

Double Dawgs students apply to the Graduate School for admission to the graduate program in the first term of the fourth year.

Individual students’ timelines will vary, so it is important to plan in consultation with both the undergraduate and graduate program advisors for any Double Dawgs program.