The Double Dawgs program was created to give ambitious and motivated students a competitive advantage in today’s knowledge economy. By earning both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in five years or less, students can save time and money while positioning themselves for success after graduation. SPIA offers seven different Double Dawgs programs. For more general information about the Double Dawgs program, click here.

How to Apply
  • All of these programs have a two-step application process. The first step is the Application to the Pathway. The requirements to apply to the Pathway are:
    • Minimum 3.5 UGA GPA
    • Minimum 60 hours in-progress with at least 30 hours of UGA coursework (excluding AP, IB, or transfer credits)
    • 9 hours of major coursework completed or in-progress
  • Once those requirements are met, an interested student submits an application to Paul Welch in 103 Candler Hall for initial eligibility review. Eligible applications are forwarded to the Double Dawg Coordinator of the graduate program for approval. Admission to the Pathway does not imply admission to the graduate program. The Pathway allows students to take graduate courses and the graduate program to test the student.
  • Accepted Pathway students begin graduate coursework as early as the fall term of the third year. 12 hours of graduate coursework applies towards both degrees, but only as general electives for the A.B. Graduate courses may not apply towards undergraduate major requirements. Students may take more than 12 hours of graduate courses before graduating with the A.B., but those credit hours beyond the 12 apply to the graduate program only. Students must graduate with the A.B. at the end of their fourth year.
  • SPIA will host further events with information specific to each graduate Double Dawgs program covering in-depth descriptions of the academics of each graduate program, differences in the Pathway, and time-lines for application to the Graduate School. There will also be information available via http://spia.uga.edu in the near future.
  • SPIA Double Dawgs Program Contacts:
    • Eligibility and A.B. Questions: Paul Welch pdwelch@uga.edu
    • Double Dawg Coordinators:
      • MPA Programmatic Questions: Aaron Redman aredman@uga.edu
      • M.A. Programmatic Questions: Megan Morgan meganjs@uga.edu 
      • M.A. Graduate Coordinators: Dr. K. Chad Clay (International Affairs) and Dr. Michael Lynch (Political Science)
AB in Political Science & MA in Political Science and International Affairs

The A.B. in Political Science offers a broad and deep understanding of politics within a structured program of study. In addition to a liberal arts foundation, it focuses on a range of courses covering politics in the United States, important debates in political philosophy, legal and constitutional issues, research skills and other topics. Students focused on public service, public policy, government, politics, and law find a ready home in the program.

The Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science and International Affairs is administered jointly by the Departments of Political Science and International Affairs and is designed as a preparation for the PhD. The program is designed for students who wish to study politics in its many forms, but who also want to develop the analytic skills necessary to achieve mastery in their areas of study. The degree offers the opportunity to specialize in international relations, comparative politics, American politics, or political theory (including methodology).

Most M.A. students will continue on to Ph.D. programs, but others will find opportunities in public service, policy organizations, data analytics companies, political consulting, and government.

The M.A. program offers two options: non-thesis or thesis.

The non-thesis option is 33 credit hours includes 8 graduate seminars and a 3 course sequence in methodology. Seminars include at least one preseminar in American politics and topical courses like “Constitutional Law: Rights and Liberties” and “Problems in Democratic Thought: Social Justice” among many others. The research sequence includes consecutive courses in POLS 7010 “Research Methods in Political Science,” POLS 7012 “Introduction to Political Methodology,” and POLS 7014 “Intermediate Political Methodology.” Additionally, non-thesis students must either pass a comprehensive exam in the student’s area of concentration or present and defend an article-length seminar paper before a faculty committee.

The thesis option is 30 credit hours including 6 graduate seminars, a 3 course methodology sequence as above, and an additional course of thesis work. A master’s thesis must be completed to earn the degree.

Double Dawgs students begin M.A. coursework in the second term of their third year with a graduate seminar. In the first term of the fourth year, students being the methodology sequence with both POLS 7010 and POLS 7012. POLS 7014 completes the methodology sequence in the second term of the fourth year while the student finishes all A.B. requirements. Ideally, 2 graduate seminars can be taken in the last term of the fourth year as well.

Double Dawgs students apply to the Graduate School at the end of their third year and first graduate courses.

Individual students’ timelines will vary, so it is important to plan in consultation with both the undergraduate and graduate program advisors for any Double Dawgs program. 

AB in International Affairs & MA in Political Science and International Affairs

The A.B. in International Affairs focuses on how governments interact with one another (international relations) and the similarities and differences in political systems (comparative politics) with additional strengths in security studies, political economy, and issues of community. It is an especially appropriate major for those who want to understand politics on the world stage, including how politics and economics combine to shape policy outcomes, how nations and leaders strategize, cooperate and interact in times of peace and in times of conflict, and how nongovernmental organizations, political movements, and demographic changes influence global events.

The Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science and International Affairs is administered jointly by the Departments of Political Science and International Affairs and is designed as a preparation for the PhD. The program is designed for students who wish to study politics in its many forms, but who also want to develop the analytic skills necessary to achieve mastery in their areas of study. The degree offers the opportunity to specialize in international relations, comparative politics, American politics, or political theory (including methodology). The Department of International Affairs has deep strength in the areas of human rights and human security.

Many M.A. students will continue on to Ph.D. programs, but others will find opportunities in public service, policy organizations, data analytics companies, and international non-profits. 

The M.A. program offers two options: non-thesis or thesis.

The non-thesis option is 33 credit hours includes 8 graduate seminars and a 3 course sequence in methodology. Seminars include at least one preseminar in international relations or in comparative politics and topical courses like “International Conflict Management” and “Comparative Politics and Digital Media” among many others. The research sequence includes consecutive courses in POLS 7010 “Research Methods in Political Science,” POLS 7012 “Introduction to Political Methodology,” and POLS 7014 “Intermediate Political Methodology.” Additionally, non-thesis students must either pass a comprehensive exam in the student’s area of concentration or present and defend an article-length seminar paper before a faculty committee.

The thesis option is 30 credit hours including 6 graduate seminars, a 3 course methodology sequence as above, and an additional course of thesis work. A master’s thesis must be completed to earn the degree.

Double Dawgs students begin M.A. coursework in the second term of their third year with INTL 6200 “Preseminar in International Relations” or INTL 6300 “Comparative Analysis and Method.” In the first term of the fourth year, students being the methodology sequence with both POLS 7010 and POLS 7012. POLS 7014 completes the methodology sequence in the second term of the fourth year while the student finishes all A.B. requirements. Ideally, 2 graduate seminars can be taken in the last term of the fourth year as well.

Double Dawgs students apply to the Graduate School at the end of their third year and first graduate courses.

Individual students’ timelines will vary, so it is important to plan in consultation with both the undergraduate and graduate program advisors for any Double Dawgs program.