Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science & International Affairs

Sam is in his final year of study for a Bachelor’s of Science in Geography and a concurrent Master’s of Arts in International Relations. From this academic background, Sam is interested in borders, conflicts resulting from their presence or absence, and the management of these conflicts under international law. To address policy and academic debates, Sam draws on his interests in spatial data, former professional experience with the U.S. Department of Defense, and theoretical IR training. Sam hopes his work assists in broader efforts to fortify international law and further expand U.S. defense cooperation.

Education

B.S. in Geography (Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry); M.A. in Political Science and International Affairs (International Relations)

More About

Originally from a small beach-town in Southeast Georgia, Sam began working on a B.S. in Geography and concurrent M.A. in International Relations at the University of Georgia in August 2016. At UGA, Sam is involved with a number of political and public service organizations, including as an At-Large Senator for the Student Government Administration, Senior Editor of the Georgia Political Review, and Vice President of Data For Good @ UGA. During his summers and alongside classes, he has twice interned with the U.S. Department of Defense, has worked as a Public Service and Outreach Intern with the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, has assisted in the teaching of an undergraduate research methods course, and has participated in faculty-mentored research as a CURO Research Assistant and Graduate Researcher in the School of Public and International Affairs.

Following his graduation in May 2020, Sam intends to work on defense and security issues before beginning law school or a Ph.D. program. Beyond his academic, political, and public-sector pursuits, Sam has traveled to nine countries, plays the drums, and mountain bikes (but mostly crashes).

Research Interests

Sam is interested in borders, conflicts resulting from their presence or absence, and the management of these conflicts under international law. Using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, his previous research has covered the framing of secessionist movements, national identity within border conflict, and the role of military power in the maintenance of international law. His current projects are heavily quantitative, using geographic information systems and spatial data to inform international relations debates. Sam’s work has received funding and recognition from the University of Georgia’s School of Public and International Affairs, Honors College, Libraries, Department of Geography, and Department of Philosophy.