Photos by Blane Marable Photography. www.blanemarable.com

Photos by Blane Marable Photography. www.blanemarable.com

The Susette M. Talarico Lecture, presented by the Criminal Justice Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Society, is hosted annually in memory of Dr. Talarico, a long-time director of the Criminal Justice Studies Program. With support from the Susette M. Talarico Fund, the Criminal Justice Society, the Departments of Political Science and Sociology, this lecture series has brought practitioners and scholars to campus to speak on a wide variety of current issues in criminal justice.

To support the Susette M. Talarico Fund, click here.

2017 TALARICO LECTURE

2017 Susette M. Talarico Lecture

presented by the Criminal Justice Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Society

Dr. Christopher Uggen
Regents Professor and Martindale Chair in Sociology and Law at the University of Minnesota

“Criminal Records, Spillovers, and the Growing Stickiness of Public Labels”

Wednesday, March 15, 2017 • 11:00 am
UGA Law School, Larry Walker Room

Contemporary criminology offers compelling evidence that the distinction between “criminal” and “non-criminal” is largely a matter of time. Yet crime discourse and policy remain rooted in the notion of criminality as an immutable individual characteristic. This talk contrasts the fluidity in criminal behavior with the growing stickiness of public labels, drawing from experimental studies of criminal records on work and school outcomes, demographic analysis of changes in the population bearing such records, and their spillover effects on health care and other institutions.

Chris Uggen studies crime, law, and justice, and is firm in the belief that sound research can help build a more just and peaceful world. With Jeff Manza, he wrote Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy, and his writing on felon voting, work and crime, and harassment and discrimination is frequently cited in media such as the New York Times, The Economist, and NPR. Current projects include a comparative study of reentry from different types of institutions, sexual harassment and employment discrimination, crime and justice after genocide, monetary sanctions, and the health effects of incarceration.

PREVIOUS TALARICO LECTURES

2009: Valerie E. Caproni, general counsel of the FBI
2010: Joe D. Whitley, former general counsel for the Department of Homeland Security
2011: Leah Ward Sears, Former Georgia Supreme Court Chief Justice
2013: John Hagan, John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law, Northwestern University / Co-director, Center on Law & Globalization at the American Bar Foundation
2014: Michael P. Downing, Deputy Chief, Los Angeles Police Department
2015: Victor Rios, University of California-Santa Barbara
2016: Steven E. Clark, Director, Presley Center for Crime and Justice Studies Director / Professor of Psychology, University of California, Riverside